Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of bladder cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

TitleVariety in vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of bladder cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsBüchner FL, Bueno-de-Mesquita BH, Ros MM, Kampman E, Egevad L, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Roswall N, Clavel-Chapelon F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Touillaud M, Kaaks R, Chang-Claude J, Boeing H, Weikert S, Trichopoulou A, Naska A, Benetou V, Palli D, Sieri S, Vineis P, Tumino R, Panico S, van Duijnhoven FJB, Peeters PHM, van Gils CH, Lund E, Gram IT, Sánchez M-J, Jakszyn P, Larrañaga N, Ardanaz E, Navarro C, Rodríguez L, Manjer J, Ehrnström R, Hallmans G, Ljungberg B, Key TJ, Allen NE, Khaw K-T, Wareham N, Slimani N, Jenab M, Boffetta P, Kiemeney LALM, Riboli E
JournalInt J Cancer
Volume128
Issue12
Pagination2971-9
Date Published2011 Jun 15
ISSN1097-0215
KeywordsDiet, Europe, Female, Fruit, Humans, Life Style, Male, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms, Vegetables
Abstract

Recent research does not show an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer risk. None of these studies investigated variety in fruit and vegetable consumption, which may capture different aspects of consumption. We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with bladder cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Detailed data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer incidence were available for 452,185 participants, who were recruited from ten European countries. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 874 participants were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Diet diversity scores (DDSs) were used to quantify the variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the effect of the DDSs on bladder cancer risk. There was no evidence of a statistically significant association between bladder cancer risk and any of the DDSs when these scores were considered as continuous covariates. However, the hazard ratio (HR) for the highest tertile of the DDS for combined fruit and vegetable consumption was marginally significant compared to the lowest (HR = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.69, p-trend = 0.05). In EPIC, there is no clear association between a varied fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer risk. This finding provides further evidence for the absence of any strong association between fruit and vegetable consumption as measured by a food frequency questionnaire and bladder cancer risk.

DOI10.1002/ijc.25636
Alternate JournalInt. J. Cancer
PubMed ID20979109