Urine Metabolic Signatures of Multiple Environmental Pollutants in Pregnant Women: An Exposome Approach.

TitleUrine Metabolic Signatures of Multiple Environmental Pollutants in Pregnant Women: An Exposome Approach.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsMaitre L, Robinson O, Martinez D, Toledano MB, Ibarluzea J, Marina LSanta, Sunyer J, Villanueva CM, Keun HC, Vrijheid M, Coen M
JournalEnviron Sci Technol
Date Published2018 Oct 30
ISSN1520-5851
Abstract

Exposure to environmental pollutants, particularly during pregnancy, can have adverse consequences on child development but little is known about the effects of pollutant mixtures on endogenous metabolism in pregnant women. We aimed to identify urinary metabolic signatures associated with low level exposure to multiple environmental pollutants in pregnant women from the INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente) birth cohort (Spain, N = 750). 35 chemical exposures were quantified in first trimester blood samples (organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, PFAS), in cord blood (mercury), and twice in urine at 12 and 32 weeks of pregnancy (metals, phthalates, bisphenol A). H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiles of urine were acquired in the same samples as pollutants. We explored associations between exposures and metabolism through an exposome-metabolome wide association scan and multivariate O2PLS modeling. Novel and reproducible associations were found across two periods of pregnancy for three nonpersistent pollutants and across two subcohorts for four of the persistent pollutants. We found novel metabolic signatures associated with arsenic exposure: TMAO and dimethylamine possibly related to gut microbial methylamine metabolism and homarine related to fish intake. Tobacco smoke exposure was related to coffee metabolism and PCBs with 3-hydroxyvaleric acid, usually released under ketoacidosis. These findings will have implications for further understanding of maternal-fetal health, and health across the life-course.

DOI10.1021/acs.est.8b02215
Alternate JournalEnviron. Sci. Technol.
PubMed ID30285427