Mortality risk in preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants in low-income and middle-income countries: a pooled country analysis.

TitleMortality risk in preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants in low-income and middle-income countries: a pooled country analysis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsKatz J, Lee ACC, Kozuki N, Lawn JE, Cousens S, Blencowe H, Ezzati M, Bhutta ZA, Marchant T, Willey BA, Adair L, Barros F, Baqui AH, Christian P, Fawzi W, Gonzalez R, Humphrey J, Huybregts L, Kolsteren P, Mongkolchati A, Mullany LC, Ndyomugyenyi R, Nien J K, Osrin D, Roberfroid D, Sania A, Schmiegelow C, Silveira MF, Tielsch J, Vaidya A, Velaphi SC, Victora CG, Watson-Jones D, Black RE
Corporate AuthorsCHERG Small-for-Gestational-Age-Preterm Birth Working Group
JournalLancet
Volume382
Issue9890
Pagination417-25
Date Published2013 Aug 3
ISSN1474-547X
KeywordsAfrica South of the Sahara, Asia, Humans, Income, Infant, Infant Mortality, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Infant, Small for Gestational Age, Prevalence, Risk Factors, South America
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Babies with low birthweight (<2500 g) are at increased risk of early mortality. However, low birthweight includes babies born preterm and with fetal growth restriction, and not all these infants have a birthweight less than 2500 g. We estimated the neonatal and infant mortality associated with these two characteristics in low-income and middle-income countries.

METHODS: For this pooled analysis, we searched all available studies and identified 20 cohorts (providing data for 2,015,019 livebirths) from Asia, Africa, and Latin America that recorded data for birthweight, gestational age, and vital statistics through 28 days of life. Study dates ranged from 1982 through to 2010. We calculated relative risks (RR) and risk differences (RD) for mortality associated with preterm birth (<32 weeks, 32 weeks to <34 weeks, 34 weeks to <37 weeks), small-for-gestational-age (SGA; babies with birthweight in the lowest third percentile and between the third and tenth percentile of a US reference population), and preterm and SGA combinations.

FINDINGS: Pooled overall RRs for preterm were 6·82 (95% CI 3·56-13·07) for neonatal mortality and 2·50 (1·48-4·22) for post-neonatal mortality. Pooled RRs for babies who were SGA (with birthweight in the lowest tenth percentile of the reference population) were 1·83 (95% CI 1·34-2·50) for neonatal mortality and 1·90 (1·32-2·73) for post-neonatal mortality. The neonatal mortality risk of babies who were both preterm and SGA was higher than that of babies with either characteristic alone (15·42; 9·11-26·12).

INTERPRETATION: Many babies in low-income and middle-income countries are SGA. Preterm birth affects a smaller number of neonates than does SGA, but is associated with a higher mortality risk. The mortality risks associated with both characteristics extend beyond the neonatal period. Differentiation of the burden and risk of babies born preterm and SGA rather than with low birthweight could guide prevention and management strategies to speed progress towards Millennium Development Goal 4--the reduction of child mortality.

FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60993-9
Alternate JournalLancet
PubMed ID23746775