Dietary and urinary metabonomic factors possibly accounting for higher blood pressure of black compared with white Americans: results of International Collaborative Study on macro-/micronutrients and blood pressure.

TitleDietary and urinary metabonomic factors possibly accounting for higher blood pressure of black compared with white Americans: results of International Collaborative Study on macro-/micronutrients and blood pressure.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsStamler J, Brown IJ, Yap IKS, Chan Q, Wijeyesekera A, Garcia-Perez I, Chadeau-Hyam M, Ebbels TMD, De Iorio M, Posma J, Daviglus ML, Carnethon M, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Elliott P
Corporate AuthorsINTERMAP Research Group
JournalHypertension
Volume62
Issue6
Pagination1074-80
Date Published2013 Dec
ISSN1524-4563
KeywordsAdult, African Americans, Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Determination, Diet, Dietary Fiber, Energy Intake, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fruit, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Metabolomics, Middle Aged, Vegetables
Abstract

Black compared with non-Hispanic white Americans have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure and rates of prehypertension/hypertension. Reasons for these adverse findings remain obscure. Analyses here focused on relations of foods/nutrients/urinary metabolites and higher black blood pressure for 369 black compared with 1190 non-Hispanic white Americans aged 40 to 59 years from 8 population samples. Multiple linear regression, standardized data from four 24-hour dietary recalls per person, two 24-hour urine collections, and 8 blood pressure measurements were used to quantitate the role of foods, nutrients, and metabolites in higher black blood pressure. Compared with non-Hispanic white Americans, blacks' average systolic/diastolic pressure was higher by 4.7/3.4 mm Hg (men) and 9.0/4.8 mm Hg (women). Control for higher body mass index of black women reduced excess black systolic/diastolic pressure to 6.8/3.8 mm Hg. Lesser intake of vegetables, fruits, grains, vegetable protein, glutamic acid, starch, fiber, minerals, and potassium, and higher intake of processed meats, pork, eggs, and sugar-sweetened beverages, along with higher cholesterol and higher Na/K ratio, related to in higher black blood pressure. Control for 11 nutrient and 10 non-nutrient correlates reduced higher black systolic/diastolic pressure to 2.3/2.3 mm Hg (52% and 33% reduction in men) and to 5.3/2.8 mm Hg (21% and 27% reduction in women). Control for foods/urinary metabolites had little further influence on higher black blood pressure. Less favorable multiple nutrient intake by blacks than non-Hispanic white Americans accounted, at least in part, for higher black blood pressure. Improved dietary patterns can contribute to prevention/control of more adverse black blood pressure levels.

DOI10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.113.01810
Alternate JournalHypertension
PubMed ID24101663
PubMed Central IDPMC3912568
Grant ListR01 HL050490 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL084228 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-HL50490 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01-HL84228 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States