Asthma and occupation in the 1958 birth cohort.

TitleAsthma and occupation in the 1958 birth cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsGhosh R E, Cullinan P, Fishwick D, Hoyle J, Warburton CJ, Strachan DP, Butland BK, Jarvis D
JournalThorax
Volume68
Issue4
Pagination365-71
Date Published04/2013
ISSN1468-3296
KeywordsAdult, Age of Onset, Asthma, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Great Britain, Humans, Logistic Models, Occupational Exposure
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of adult onset asthma with lifetime exposure to occupations and occupational exposures. METHODS: We generated lifetime occupational histories for 9488 members of the British 1958 birth cohort up to age 42 years. Blind to asthma status, jobs were coded to the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 and an Asthma Specific Job Exposure Matrix (ASJEM) with an expert re-evaluation step. Associations of jobs and ASJEM exposures with adult onset asthma were assessed in logistic regression models adjusting for sex, smoking, social class at birth and childhood hay fever. RESULTS: Of the 7406 cohort members with no asthma or wheezy bronchitis in childhood, 639 (9%) reported asthma by age 42 years. Adult onset asthma was associated with 18 occupations, many previously identified as risks for asthma (eg, farmers: OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.06 to 8.80; hairdressers: OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.85; printing workers: OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.49 to 6.18). Four were cleaning occupations and a further three occupations were likely to use cleaning agents. Adult onset asthma was associated with five of the 18 high-risk specific ASJEM exposures (flour exposure: OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.17 to 3.85; enzyme exposure: OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.22 to 4.42; cleaning/disinfecting products: OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.22; metal and metal fumes: OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.07; textile production: OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.61). Approximately 16% (95% CI 3.8% to 27.1%) of adult onset asthma was associated with known asthmagenic occupational exposures. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that about 16% of adult onset asthma in British adults born in the late 1950s could be due to occupational exposures, mainly recognised high-risk exposures.

DOI10.1136/thoraxjnl-2012-202151
Alternate JournalThorax
PubMed ID23339164