Associations of High-Density Lipoprotein Particle and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With Alcohol Intake, Smoking, and Body Mass Index - The INTERLIPID Study.

TitleAssociations of High-Density Lipoprotein Particle and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With Alcohol Intake, Smoking, and Body Mass Index - The INTERLIPID Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsZaid M, Miura K, Okayama A, Nakagawa H, Sakata K, Saitoh S, Okuda N, Yoshita K, Choudhury SR, Rodriguez B, Masaki K, Willcox B, Miyagawa N, Okamura T, Chan Q, Elliott P, Stamler J, Ueshima H
Corporate AuthorsINTERLIPID and INTERMAP Research Groups
JournalCirc J
Volume82
Issue10
Pagination2557-2565
Date Published2018 Sep 25
ISSN1347-4820
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recently, high-density lipoprotein particles (HDL-P) have been found to be more strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk than their counterpart, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Given that lifestyle is among the first targets in CAD prevention, we compared the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with selected lifestyle factors. Methods and Results: We examined 789 Japanese participants of the INTERLIPID Study: men (n=386) and women (n=403) aged 40-59 years in 1996-1998. Participants treated for dyslipidemias were excluded. Lifestyle factors included alcohol intake, smoking amount, and body mass index (BMI). Multivariable linear regression was used for cross-sectional analyses of these factors with HDL-P, HDL-C, HDL-P size subclasses (small, medium and large) and mean HDL-P size. In men, higher alcohol intake was associated with higher HDL-P and higher HDL-C. The associations of alcohol, however, were strongest with HDL-P. A higher smoking amount tended to be associated with lower HDL-P and HDL-C. In contrast, BMI was not associated with HDL-P, but was strongly inversely associated with HDL-C. While alcohol intake favored larger mean HDL-P size, smoking and BMI favored a lipid profile with smaller HDL-P subclasses and overall smaller mean HDL-P size. Similar, but generally weaker results were observed in women.

CONCLUSIONS: Although both HDL-P and HDL-C are parameters of HDL, they have different associations with alcohol, smoking and BMI.

DOI10.1253/circj.CJ-18-0341
Alternate JournalCirc. J.
PubMed ID30135319