High Impact of Air Pollution in London Revealed by Imperial College & King's College

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Air pollution is having an increasing risk for vulnerable Londoners at both ends of the age spectrum:

Both unborn babies and people over the age of 60 in London are being impacted by the dangerous exposure to the fumes and toxic chemicals being omitted by traffic. 

Air pollution is having an increasing risk for vulnerable Londoners at both ends of the age spectrum:

Both unborn babies and people over the age of 60 in London are being impacted by the dangerous exposure to the fumes and toxic chemicals being omitted by traffic.

Imperial College and King’s College London have published evidence founded on ongoing research exposing the danger of current air pollution levels in and around the capital.

Professor Frank Kelly of King’s College Environmental department stated that the ‘direct evidence of harm… from diesel pollution’ was undisputable, and stressed that the research findings were particularly relevant as they demonstrated the need to ‘clean up our cities’.

The study showed a huge disparity in benefit for those over 60 exercising (gentle walk) on London’s Oxford street, as opposed to Hyde Park. Those participating found that lung capacity increased more whilst walking in a people only area such as the park, as opposed to walking down the traffic packed shopping path of central London's Oxford Street, after which lung capacity had increased only a fraction.The differentiating factor between the two locations chosen for the study of the elderly exercise was the feature of diesel vehicles such as cars, busses and taxis, for example. 

A seperate study also revealed that air pollution in London was related to an increase of 2 - 6% probability of babies being born underweight. This latest news indicated expectant mothers who work and commute in the city, are  exposed to dangerous levels which then have direct impacts on the foetus during the gestation period. Babies born with a low birth weight are at higher risk, and can have increased links to developing health problems such as diabetes later in life. 

For an overview of the recent research and more information on air pollution research generally, please read the full article on King's College website